Thursday, January 10, 2013

Cake Batter Rice Krispies Treats

Everyone knows about Rice Krispies Treats - the recipe's been on the cereal box for AGES. They're super easy to make (I'm pretty sure you can actually make them in the microwave), and, if you don't feel like actually preparing them yourself, you can even buy them already made

These? These are different. These are CAKE BATTER Rice Krispies Treats (except my cheap-ass used store-brand "Crispy Rice" cereal) . All you need to do is add a bit of dry boxed yellow cake mix (as in, don't prepare the batter or anything), and add some rainbow sprinkles for a bit of fun color. 


I've ALWAYS loved cake batter - nowadays, you can actually buy products with "cake batter" flavor, from ice cream, to even yogurt. This recipe brings back a favorite sticky childhood treat, and the fun of licking the cake batter or brownie mixing spoon, but without the intestinal worms that I never did catch...


Cake Batter Rice Krispies Treats
adapted from Gimme Some Oven

Ingredients:
3 Tbsp butter
1 10oz bag miniature marshmallows
1/3 cup dry yellow cake mix
5 cups Rice Krispies
1 1.75oz container rainbow sprinkles


Melt the butter in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the marshmallows and stir until they begin to melt. Add in the dry cake mix, a spoonful at a time, stirring to combine. Remove from heat.










Stir in the cereal and mix until completely coated. Sprinkle in 1/2 of the sprinkles and stir to combine. 





Press the mixture into a 13x9" baking dish and top with the remaining sprinkles. Let stand for about 30 minutes, then cut into squares with a knife sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. 






8 comments:

  1. I think it's salmonella from raw eggs that you're supposed to be in danger of catching from unbaked batter/dough, not worms. Either way . . . I've never known anyone who got sick from it. It's not as though it sits around long enough to spoil, right??

    I could think of so many things to do with this, it's not even funny. German chocolate Krispie squares, anyone?

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    1. I'm pretty sure it's the raw eggs/salmonella that everyone worries about, too. That being said, I know I've eaten my fair share of raw egg over the years, whether from Caesar salads (luckily, MY recipe doesn't use raw eggs) or licking spoons/beaters from numerous cake/brownie mixes. Not to mention raw cookie dough!

      The "worms" thing is a habit of mine - it all comes from that line in "A Christmas Story" where the Mom tells the Dad not to touch the turkey because, "It still has an hour to cook. You'll get worms". I guess "worms" has become my catch-all term for foodbourne illness, and I sometimes forget not everyone thinks like me, haha!!

      Also, German Chocolate Krispies? THAT SOUNDS AMAZING!

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  2. Julia, your dish looks yummy, thank you for posting. I would like to ask you about a cast iron skillet I just found/bought. I read your post about recondition & re-season cast iron several times and you so inspired me to go skillet hunting, not an easy task I might add. I hope I did ok - I found a 12" Lodge Cast Iron Skillet with the rim on the bottom, shows made in the USA. I'm getting ready to follow your instructions and pray it turns out well. I just have a question that I wasn't even aware of - can I use this cast iron skillet on a glass top cooking surface??? I would love to hear back from you. Thank you and God bless!!! Tina

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    1. Hi, Tina!! Sounds like you've found an old piece - those rims on the bottom are known as "heat rings" and are common in older pieces - the rings actually would fit into slots on OLD cast iron stove eyes! I have a Birmingham Stove & Range skillet with one (I bought it solely because it's from my city!).

      You CAN use cast iron skillets with a glass cooktop; somewhere DEEP in the comments on the huge cast iron post are some links from actual cooktop mfrs and cast iron companies stating so. HOWEVER, with the heat ring, I would worry about scratching the glass cooktop. Also, the heat ring can sometimes lead to uneven heating, as only that part of the skillet is touching the heat source.

      BUT, don't get discouraged! Since you found a 12", it SHOULD work fine (bigger skillets, to me, always have better heat distribution). ALSO, if you are worried about the glass cooktop, you can ALWAYS use the skillet in the oven. I use my 12" for things like frittatas, brownies/giant cookies, and they are AMAZING for roasting chickens!

      I hope this helps, but PLEASE let me know if you have any moer questions and I'll be happy to help!

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  3. Hi Julia, thanks so much for responding, I want you to know how much I appreciate it. I felt like a real winner yesterday when I found my Lodge skillet. During my long search, all I could find was 5" skillets and that size just wouldn't work for my family. So when I found this one yesterday I kept waiting for bells & whistles and confetti to fall from the sky :).
    I would love to email you a picture to see if you would take a peek for me, it's not reconditioned yet, but I would love your option and also to confirm that it is an old piece. Thank you again, and God's blessing to you and your family, Tina

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    1. Sure! Feel free to email me pictures (ibelieveicanfry@gmail.com) and I'll be happy to take a look. It will probably be later this afternoon before I can really look though; I've got a training run this morning, and then afterwards I'm going to a LEGO Fair (lame, right?).

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  4. No, I wouldn't say lame, when I'm the one scouring my local area for aged cookware - right??? Thanks for the giggle, I will get pictures emailed shortly. Tina

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  5. This recipe is not vegetarian - marshmallows are made of gelatin. ugh.

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